8 sales tactics that will convert a Facebook fan into a customer

Reaching your customer on Facebook can be done in many ways.
  1. You create compelling content organically on your page
  2. You advertise your product or service
  3. You give incentives to people through a Facebook app campaign that you can build with software such as SocialBrands
Regardless of your method of choice, once you get the attention of your potential prospect, what do you tell him that persuades him not to buy your product tomorrow, next week or next month, but right at this second? That’s what we’ll discuss in this article. You see, you can reach your potential customer easily through Facebook. However, you rarely close a sale on Facebook itself. Facebook should be used as a channel to pave the way by pre-selling your product and attracting leads. What follows after you’ve reached him is a potential sale, and you’re responsible for giving your prospect all the right information so that he can decide to choose for you. In this article, I’ll give you 8 tactics that you can add on your website or landing page that will double your sales:
  1. The Opening
  2. The Problem
  3. The Description
  4. The Benefit
  5. The Guarantee
  6. The Alternative
  7. The Penalty
  8. The Close
Next time you read a sales page, keep an eye open for these elements. You’ll see them emerge repeatedly when reading a sales copy. Opening

1. The Opening

When you start your pitch, it’s always good to establish a connection by talking about something your prospect is already thinking about, making him curious to find out more about your business. There are certain human emotions that constantly occupy a part of our brain. If you manage to tune in on them, you’ll have your prospect’s attention. Thereafter, you can tie it up to the product of service you’re offering. Let’s take an example on how you could open for a business owner: “She didn’t buy anything.” How often has this happened to you? When a potential customer walks out of your store without buying anything it costs you real money. Once you have his attention, you could follow up by offering social media marketing services for instance, which flows logically with the opening statement. Find the thing your prospect is interested in and make it your point of contact, instead of rushing and trying to sell immediately.

2. The Problem

After opening and grabbing his attention, describe the problem to your prospect in great detail. If it’s about health, talk about feeling exhausted after walking up a flight of stairs. If it’s about business, clarify how he’s losing money or being overwhelmed by minutiae. If it’s about relationships, explain the intimate emotions the prospect’s missing out on. Of course this should be done in an educated and moral way, but don’t be afraid to pound on the problem. If you do this correctly, people will feel a connection with you, which will make them even more curious as to what you have to say next.

Description3. The Description

You create a picture of what it is you’re suggesting and explaining the most important features of your product and service. You can add any details if necessary. Describing a product or service is talking about yourself. It’s necessary. A description explains all the features of your product and plays a supporting role used to justify and support the claims of your benefits. A description will never sell your product by the thousands though. What counts is what it will do for your prospect!

4. The Benefit

The reason “why” he should buy from you. You create a desire in your prospect by describing what it will do for him. Pleasure, freedom, comfort, profit, attractiveness. This is not to be confused with the description. The description explains the mechanics, the benefits explain the results from the mechanics. This is an important distinction to make, because people are usually more motivated by the benefit than the process. It doesn’t matter HOW you do it, but what truly matters is WHAT you do for them. To understand the benefit of your product, ask yourself the following question: “What does this mean on an emotional level for my prospect?” Take an “8 week program for getting a six-pack” for instance. The 8 week program is not necessarily what your prospect wants. The six-pack on the other hand is what he feels good about. In this case it’s important to emphasize the benefit of the six-pack that results from the program, and not to solely give prominence to the program. Be sure to give the description, which is the logical reason for him to buy your product, but if you want action of any kind, emphasize some kind of primary emotion. There are 6 great benefits of human action:
  1. Love
  2. Gain
  3. Duty
  4. Pride
  5. Self-indulgence
  6. Self-preservation
These can be mixed of course. Someone may want a new smartphone, solely from a feeling of pride, but if money is equally important to him, pride alone won’t make him buy it. Guarantee

5. The Guarantee

You offer your prospect proof of what you’re selling by establishing trust, authority and confidence. Every piece of sales copy must have some form of proof or markers of credibility. - You can prove you’re telling the truth by showing credible testimonials from previous customers. - You can take away the risk he’s taking with your product by giving him a money-back-guarantee. - You can show a successful case study where you explain how you did it. - If you’ve been in the press, you can show excerpts or pass the link to establish authority. Ask yourself what a prospect could stop him from buying from you, and give him a counter argument for it with some kind of proof.

6. The Alternative

Lay out all the possible alternatives for your prospect, give the pros and cons, and inform them why you’re the best choice. In most cases, your business is dealing with competitors, and your prospect knows that. So instead of denying your competition, it’s best to deal with them. Even better, if you display the alternatives and open the discussion, you control the arguments. Any benefit a competitor might have, you have the chance to explain to your prospect why you’re the better choice. So you’re doing Aikido with your prospect by taking any argument he might have before he even thinks about it, and gently disabling it without attacking it. That’s marketing on a level most people don’t even think about.

7. The Penalty

You persuade your prospect to take immediate action by showing the loss in money or opportunity if he doesn’t act now. When using a penalty, it’s important to be specific. If you only have a certain supply left, give the exact quantity. If you’ll be raising your price after a month of discount, give the exact percentage! There is a reason you see “limited edition” everywhere, it works! You can use this strategically to convince people to take action now, instead of creating the reaction by default “I’ll do that later”, which eventually never happens. Use the penalty, morally, to persuade him to take action now. You can do this in many ways. You could offer: - We only accept 20 new customers per month! - A bonus for the first 50 customers! - A discount within a certain window of time. “We close our offer the 31st of March!” CTA

8. The Close

You tell your prospect exactly what and how he has to do it, which makes it easy for him to take immediate action. When you succeed in creating a want in your customer to buy, you have to tell him exactly what to do! Make it as easy as possible, so he will not have a reason for not ordering. These tactics are the mechanics to a good sales page. Once you start getting into writing more sales copy, they become second nature. Your first draft might have all these tactics visible paragraph by paragraph, but after some practice they will flow into one big piece so that a novice might not see what you’re doing.

2 Bonus tips

Your First Draft Let me give you my favorite productivity hack for writing a good draft of sales copy: sit down and write. It may feel like it’s not easy to write your first draft, although the only thing you need to do is to pull the trigger and start writing. Just write, don’t reflect. Once you’ve written a first draft, you might like most of it or just a piece of it. Use the angle that most excites you and keep building. Don’t use difficult words Unless you have a very niche market with an educated audience there is no reason to use big difficult words. They will only confuse potential customers. Is it possible to sell goods with easy words to an educated customer? Yes it is. Is it possible to sell goods with difficult words to an uneducated customer? Probably not. So easy language wins. Don’t use big words, keep your offer accessible. That’s it! Use these 8 tactics in your sales copy on your website and you’ll see your sales rise!